Home Africa SouthAfrica: Elimination of the Child Labour is coming to a close

SouthAfrica: Elimination of the Child Labour is coming to a close

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Group of happy African children from Samburu tribe, Kenya, Africa. Samburu tribe is north-central Kenya, and they are related to the Maasai.

The 5th International World Conference on the Elimination of Child Labor finished its fifth and final day of side activities and thematic panel discussions on Thursday, May 19, 2022, at the ICC in Durban, South Africa. The panel talks were fruitful and beneficial, laying the groundwork for a commitment to eradicate child labor. The conference was held for the first time on African land, and history was made when children were included and given a voice for the first time at the conference. The conference will end on May 20, 2022, with the acceptance of the Durban Call to Action and a closing ceremony.

The day’s thematic panels tackled topics like child labor in agriculture and supply networks, as well as mitigating vulnerabilities.

The hybrid conference allowed attendees to communicate both online and in-person during the week. Also noteworthy is the section where Dreams of Gold can be streamed using a virtual reality headset. Attendees were virtually transported to a gold mine in Ghana, where they were exposed to child labor for a few moments.

The agriculture sector accounts for 70% of children engaging in child labor worldwide. According to the most recent Global Child Labor Estimates, an additional 4 million children will be employed in child labor between 2016 and 2020. COVID-19’s socioeconomic effects on food security and agricultural livelihoods have pushed more children into agricultural child labor. Target 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goal will not be met without a breakthrough in this area.

Global, regional, national, and local experts shared their perspectives on how to better position sustainable and resilient agri-food systems as a crucial element in eradicating child labor throughout the roundtable.

“We can abolish child labor in agriculture if programs are responsive and target at-risk homes if root reasons are addressed and small farmer associations are reinforced, and if we engage in programs like school meals,” said Bernd Seiffert, Focal Point for Children. At FAO, I work in Agriculture.

She emphasized the importance of cross-cutting themes including social protection, climate-smart practices, and women’s empowerment in a sector-wide strategy.

Thoko Didiza, South Africa’s Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform, and Rural Development, echoed this opinion, emphasizing the need of tackling the core causes of child labor. “Agriculture is still a significant part of our economy,” he remarked, “and it touches on a variety of issues.”

The 5th Global Conference on the Elimination of Child Labor is coming to a close in South Africa, and knowledge building and awareness-raising are critical in the fight against child labor.

The 5th International World Conference on the Elimination of Child Labor finished its fifth and final day of side activities and thematic panel discussions on Thursday, May 19, 2022, at the ICC in Durban, South Africa. The panel talks were fruitful and beneficial, laying the groundwork for a commitment to eradicate child labor. The conference was held for the first time on African land, and history was made when children were included and given a voice for the first time at the conference. The conference will end on May 20, 2022, with the acceptance of the Durban Call to Action and a closing ceremony.

The day’s thematic panels tackled topics like child labor in agriculture and supply networks, as well as mitigating vulnerabilities.

The hybrid conference allowed attendees to communicate both online and in-person during the week. Also noteworthy is the section where Dreams of Gold can be streamed using a virtual reality headset. Attendees were virtually transported to a gold mine in Ghana, where they were exposed to child labor for a few moments.

The agriculture sector accounts for 70% of children engaging in child labor worldwide. According to the most recent Global Child Labor Estimates, an additional 4 million children will be employed in child labor between 2016 and 2020. COVID-19’s socioeconomic effects on food security and agricultural livelihoods have pushed more children into agricultural child labor. Target 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goal will not be met without a breakthrough in this area.

Global, regional, national, and local experts shared their perspectives on how to better position sustainable and resilient agri-food systems as a crucial element in eradicating child labor throughout the roundtable.

“We can abolish child labor in agriculture if programs are responsive and target at-risk homes core reasons are addressed and small farmer associations are reinforced, and if we engage in programs like school meals,” said Bernd Seiffert, Focal Point for Children. At FAO, I work in Agriculture.

She emphasized the importance of cross-cutting themes including social protection, climate-smart practices, and women’s empowerment in a sector-wide strategy.

Thoko Didiza, South Africa’s Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform, and Rural Development, echoed this opinion, emphasizing the need of tackling the core causes of child labor. “Agriculture is still a significant part of our economy,” he remarked, “and it touches on a variety of issues.” “Child labor will not be solved unless poverty, conflict, and war are addressed.”

He also advocated for spot checks to ensure that the regulations are followed, as well as collaboration within the sectors to ensure that nothing is overlooked. It is simple to pass laws, but it is critical to ensure that they are followed.

People need to speak out against child labor, it was noted. There should be anonymous lines set up where this may be reported.

To reduce child labor, collaboration is required. To #EndChilldLabour, all ministers must stand together.

Specific vulnerabilities, such as poverty, dangers, and shocks, have a role in child labor. Children who lack proper access to finance, health services, and social protection are more likely to work and receive an education.

Panelists discussed cultural, social, and economic aspects in this session, putting light on the complex core causes that keep children working.

“We must act, engage children, and take a rights-based approach,” said Najat Maalla M’jid, the UN Secretary-Special General’s Representative on Violence Against Children.

“Amna Shabbir stated, “The most important thing we have done in Pakistan is to stop normalizing child labor.” She was open and honest about her country’s efforts to safeguard children from child labor: There are two international conventions, 40 legal frameworks, and 20 agencies dedicated solely to the protection of children’s rights. Pakistan’s world-class carpet weaving and soccer ball manufacturing industries are now completely free of child labor, sending a powerful message of hope to other countries with high child labor rates. It’s conceivable.

Supply networks are intricate and intertwined. In the afternoon, the panelists explored the structural elements that render them vulnerable to child labor.

Claudine Ndusi M’Kembe of the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s Ministry of Labor spoke about some of the actions her country has made to address the core issues. Cobalt mining in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which produces 60% of the world’s cobalt, has recently drawn international notice. Child labor is still a serious issue in small-scale artisanal miners, unfortunately.

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